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Flood Prevention Measures

Stormwater is a term that refers to rain and melted snow and ice. Stormwater runoff from your roof, driveway and other hard surfaces is typically directed away from your house, towards the street and into the municipal storm sewer system.

Along the way, the runoff picks up harmful substances such as road salt, heavy metals and oils. In an urban setting, runoff should flow into the storm sewer or soak slowly into the ground without entering the sanitary sewer. If excess storm water does enter the sanitary sewer system, it can overload the system.

When the sanitary sewer becomes overloaded, the water level in the system rises above normal design levels, a condition referred to as “surcharge.” Basement flooding can occur if the home has sanitary fixtures or floor drains below the surcharge level.

Protect Your Investment - FloodProof Your Home

Approved measures that improve household drainage include sump pump and drywell installation, installation of sewer bark up prevention devices and the disconnection of weeping tile systems from City sanitary sewer services:

Sump pumpSump Pump

Groundwater around the home collected by the weeping tile should go to the sump pit and be pumped away from the house using one or more sump pumps. A rebate of up to 50% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,500 including labour, materials, permit and taxes is available through the City's Residential Drainage Assistance Program administered by EcoSuperior. See our Drainage Rebate webpage.

Sewer Back Up PreventionResidential Backflow Prevention Device

Sewer back up preventers are mechanical devices designed to allow the flow of sanitary sewage in one direction only – away from your home. A rebate of up to 50% of the invoiced cost up to a maximum of $1,750 including labour, materials, permit and taxes is available through the City's Residential Drainage Assistance Program administered by EcoSuperior. See our Drainage Rebate webpage.

Weeping Tile

Weeping Tile

Weeping tile, an essential component of household drainage systems, is installed at the base of a footing to collect water from the backfill around a house. Historically these tile drains were connected to the municipal sanitary sewer.

Current building standards do not allow this type of connection, which contributes excess stormwater into the sanitary sewer system. Instead weeping tile should drain to a sump pit and drywell system. A rebate of up to 100% to a maximum of $500 including labour, materials, permit and taxes is available through the City's Residential Drainage Assistance Program administered by EcoSuperior. See our Drainage Rebate webpage.